Top Stories:

St. Louis area faces big cleanup effort after flooding

Ty Burch, from left, 6, mother Casey, brother Brody, 4, and father Keith, behind Brody, look out over the swollen Mississippi River floodwater rushing by Cape Girardeau, Mo., Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon stopped in Cape Girardeau, where about two dozen homes were damaged. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

As the Mississippi River and its tributaries retreated from historic winter levels that flooded towns, forced evacuations and killed two dozen people, residents in the St. Louis area were facing a massive cleanup and recovery effort that will likely last weeks.

“The healing process, the restoration process has begun,” Chris Greenhagen, pastor of the Central Baptist Church in Eureka, Missouri, one of the communities hit by flooding along the Meramec River earlier this week, said Saturday in a telephone interview.

The flood, fueled by more than 10 inches of rain over a three-day period that began last weekend, is blamed for 24 deaths in Illinois and Missouri.

Water from the Mississippi, Meramec and Missouri rivers largely began receding Friday in the St. Louis area. Two major highways — Interstate 44 and Interstate 55 — reopened south of St. Louis on Friday and some evacuees were also allowed then to return home.

While residents took stock of the ruin, President Barack Obama on Saturday signed a federal emergency declaration for Missouri that allows federal aid to be used to help state and local response efforts. It also allows the Federal Emergency Management Agency to coordinate disaster relief efforts. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon had asked for the help.

Nixon and Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner also toured flood-ravaged areas as near-record crest predictions of the Mississippi River and levee breaks threatened more homes.

In Missouri, Noelle Pace said she packed up electronics, some furniture and her 4-year-old son’s clothing and toys and left Pacific on Dec. 28, the day after she received a request to evacuate. She felt lucky to find the damage isolated to her crawl space when she returned for the first time Thursday.

“Everybody around us had catastrophic damage,” Pace said. She said she might not be able to move back for weeks while her landlord replaces soaked insulation.

“It doesn’t feel real yet,” she said.

Illinois Emergency Management Agency spokeswoman Patti Thompson said the state’s flooding death toll increased to nine. Fifteen have died in Missouri.

Rauner encouraged people to respect requests to evacuate.

“This is life-threatening,” he told reporters at Carlyle Lake in Clinton County in southern Illinois. “It’s not just the water; it’s the temperature. Hypothermia is a big risk to people’s lives.”

The main culprit in the St. Louis region was the Meramec River, a relatively small Mississippi tributary that bombarded communities in the far southwestern reaches of the St. Louis suburbs during the week. Two wastewater treatment plants were so damaged by the floodwaters that raw sewage spewed into the river. Hundreds of people were evacuated in the Missouri communities of Pacific, Eureka, Valley Park and Arnold, where many homes took…

TennesseeWatchman.com

 if the watchman sees the sword coming and does not blow the trumpet, and the people are not warned, and the sword comes and takes any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity; but his blood I will require at the watchman’s hand.

Disclaimer:

Opinions posted on TennesseeWatchman.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of TennesseeWatchman.com or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.
%d bloggers like this: