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“Centuries of marriage”

By Jerry Newcombe

The cover story of the upcoming TIME magazine (6/13/16) is “How to Stay Married (and Why).”

Marriage does matter, despite what the liberal culture says, because the family is the building block of society. As the family goes so goes society.

Writing for TIME, Belinda Luscombe writes, “Most Americans of every stripe still want to get married – even millennials, although they’re waiting until they’re older.”

Luscombe adds, “For those who can stay the course, indicators that a long marriage is worth the slog continue to mount. Studies suggest that married people have better health, wealth and even sex lives than singles, and will probably die happier.”

She goes on to note: “Most scholars agree that the beneficial health effects are robust: happily married people are less likely to have strokes, heart disease or depression, and they respond better to stress and heal more quickly.”

I find it interesting that Luscombe observes that Christian counselor Dr. Gary Chapman, author of The Five Love Languages, is “arguably the country’s most successful marriage therapist.” Luscombe does not mention the biblical framework out of which Dr. Chapman conducts all his work, however.

I interviewed Dr. Chapman for Christian television about ten years ago. Chapman told our viewers: “I realized early on in my counseling of couples that what made one person feel loved didn’t make another person feel loved.”

For example, a couple sought counsel in Dr. Chapman’s office. The husband was hard-working, and he helped with all the housework. He asked his wife, “What do you mean I don’t love you?”

And she turned to Chapman and said, “You know, he’s right. He’s a hard-working man, but we don’t ever talk. I want him to sit down and talk with me.”

Chapman recognized that one person experiences love one way – others in different ways: “From these kinds of counseling sessions, I realized, people were trying. They were loving, but they were not connecting with each other.”

After about 15 years of this, “I realized that I was hearing the same stories over and over again – when someone said to me, ‘I feel like my spouse doesn’t love me,’ what did they want? I had it in my notes, and they fell into five categories. And I later called them the five love languages – And everybody has a primary love language out of the five that really speaks to them deeply. And if you don’t speak your spouse’s primary love language, then they won’t feel loved, even if you’re speaking the other four. So, that’s the concept.”

Chapman said the five love languages are: “words of affirmation,” “giving gifts,” “undivided attention” (time), “acts of service,” and “physical touch.”

Chapman adds, “When couples learn how to speak each other’s language and they connect emotionally, it’s like the love tank inside them begins to fill up. And really, there’s a whole new climate between the two of them emotionally.”

Chapman is grateful to the Lord that He has used his book so well. He told me, “It’s been really exciting to see…

TennesseeWatchman.com

 if the watchman sees the sword coming and does not blow the trumpet, and the people are not warned, and the sword comes and takes any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity; but his blood I will require at the watchman’s hand.

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