Patriots at Dayton dinner hail Trump, assert blessings of constitution

 

Nooganomics.com  |

Though they love the U.S. Bill of Rights, men and women rise and salute the federal banner as if still represented their interests in lawful government. (Photo David Tulis)

Homeschooled teenager Jake Griffin, 15, and Jillian Edmonds listen to Jake's grandmother, June Griffin, address the Bill of Rights dinner in Dayton, Tenn. (Photo David Tulis)

Homeschooled teenager Jake Griffin, 15, and Jillian Edmonds listen to Jake’s grandmother, June Griffin, address the Bill of Rights dinner in Dayton, Tenn. (Photo David Tulis)

College student Britany Gaddy says she gets more from her first Bill of Rights dinner than she learned in high school. Her grandmother is a pro se litigant defending property rights. (Photo David Tulis)

College student Brittany Gaddy says she gets more from her first Bill of Rights dinner than she learned in high school. Her grandmother is a pro se litigant defending property rights. (Photo David Tulis)

A sigh of relief swept across the audience at the Bill of Rights dinner Thursday in Dayton, Tenn., an annual event 15 years running which celebrates constitutional government and the struggle of free people against deadpanning judges and  state bureaus.

The event is organized by June Griffin, outspoken critic of the modern state and a frequent claimant upon the mercies and protections of God.

By David Tulis / Noogaradio 1240 AM 101.1 FM

About 45 people from Chattanooga and villages such as Ocoee and Powell joined in agreement at expressions of delight at the Donald Trump victory against Hillary Clinton, perceived universally among the group’s small-town attendees as the nemesis of Christianity.

Mrs. Clinton had promised to extend by force the claims of queer theory against marriage and Christian bakeshops, harass homeschoolers for the sake of public policy, strand freedom-loving buyers of supplements and unpasteurized milk, continue wars of attrition against invisible enemies, enhance the security state and surveillance, and censor Wikileaks, Lewrockwell, Breitbart and other “fake news” platforms.

Audience members who did not stay up late for election returns recalled with delight their reactions when they discovered the next morning that Mr. Trump had won. Still, they don’t put much stock those presiders-in-chief in Washington, D.C, especially when both contenders were New Yorkers from the federal duopoly of Republican and Democrat.

Patriots at the shotgun-shell decorated cafe tables in Dayton put more stock in constitutional government, and are proud to declare it.

Though Mr. Trump offends the tenderest American spirits, especially at universities, people at the Bill of Rights event say his election is a work of God in favor of common Americans. God has had mercy upon the nation and its people, even though their government turns against Him by prohibiting defense of the unborn and officially slandering marriage. Nothing was said in objection to the U.S.’ foreign wars nor the federal banner, proudly saluted as festivities cranked up.

‘God bill’ backer

One of the speakers at the event, Ivan Harmon, is a former 12-year Knoxville city council member and eight-year county commission member who got his colleagues to pass “the God bill” in that county.

He indicated that the country’s moral declension has invited evil in high places, and that it is a blessing if common people such as he be willing to stand for office, starting small with county school boards.

The audience included many who are familiar with libertarian or Christian causes. Among them Rick Tyler and his wife, Jessica, from Ocoee, Tenn. He is the former federal candidate who said in a billboard that God needs to make America white again.

He is a man with several children and is a homeschooler familiar with some of the issues that we traced here at nick.com, such as the right to travel vs. transportation and movement and commerce.

Couple’s heroic stand

Among those held up for their heroic stand were Spencer  Owens, 74, and his wife Odine who endured a 17-year court case involving the attempted sale of a company Owens Transport  Co. The case drew to a close in 2015, and was a costly conflict blameable on misfeasance between a judge and an attorney, Mr. Owens said.

The big heroes of the evening were another senior couple, Thomas and Carol Gaddy, who are in a property rights fight with city hall in Dunlap, Tenn., just over the mountain from Dayton. The town government is demanding a “inspection” of their house for improvements without a permit, but did not start the case with an affidavit of probable cause. The Gaddys have fought for two years, filling a large case folder in Sequatchie County circuit court. They thanked Mrs. Griffin for her accolades, and vowed to keep fighting, with God’s help.

Encouraging younger generation

Brittany Gaddy is a music education student at Rhinehart University near Atlanta, and is following from afar a grandmother’s legal struggles to prevent a search of her house in Dunlap, Tenn., without a warrant of probable cause. She says the ideas she absorbed at the dinner are greater than those tossed her way in high school.

“It was so applicable to what is going on currently, and we weren’t learning just about things that were past *** the history stuff that make some students go to sleep at school.

At the bill of rights banquet I learned a lot about the actual rights that the citizen of the United States has, rights that we are typically uninformed about *** and that they have to stand up for themselves and proclaim what they believe.”

One of the speakers at the event, Ivan Harmon, is a former 12 year Knoxville city council member and 8 year County Commission member who got his college to pass the god bill in that County.

He indicated that the country’s moral declension has invited evil in high places.

One man who spoke, Keith Miller, came with his wife Karen, a Blount County commissioner who sponsored a resolution sticking so-called gay marriage in the eye and upholding marriage. She won office from “a lot of hard work, the patriots coming out to vote, and a lot of prayer and I give all the glory to God. It was just the time or a change in the county.” She is one of 21 commissioners, and wouldn’t say anything about those she called “the good old boy network” among the 21 officeholders in that rural, fiercely independent-peopled county.

The audience included many who are familiar with libertarian or Christian causes. Among them are Rick Tyler and his wife Jessica from Ocoee, Tenn. He was a candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives who said in a billboard that “Make America White Again.”

“We’re appalled that the public high school in Polk County, they are now forming, and the students have to be under some modicum of sponsorship from a faculty member, they are forming what the call a gay-straight alliance club which is really a euphemism for a pro-homosexual club for so-called gay students.”

Ivan Harmon, a former Knoxville council member and Knox County commissioner, tells of defending godly ideals in office. (Photo David Tulis)

Ivan Harmon, a former Knoxville council member and Knox County commissioner, tells of defending godly ideals in office. Through the window of the cafe is seen the Dayton public library and its rows of books. Bill of rights matron June Griffin is with him. (Photo David Tulis)

“And there doesn’t seem to be even a whimper of resistance or opposition coming forth from the overwhelmingly professing Christian community.”

In a bid to unseat Chuck Fleischman, who represents Washington to the people in a Chattanooga-Knoxville district, Mr. Tyler came in third in a field of five. The controversy over his billboard sapped his business among the youthful and liberal patrons of river outfitters during the campaign, leaving him little time to campaign.

Fliers like this one suggest the backers of the constitution feel betrayed by holders of public office.

Fliers like this one suggest the backers of the constitution feel betrayed by holders of public office.

Keith Miller addresses the crowd at the Bill of Rights dinner on Thursday.

Keith Miller addresses the crowd at the Bill of Rights dinner on Thursday.

He and his wife Jessica have 19 children, more than half a dozen between them. They run a rafting business and restaurant that took a hit in business after he posted his populist billboard in Ocoee, the whitewater rafting and adventure hub. He is a homeschooler who is familiar with many seemingly off-grid topics such as the right to travel and the rights of people who as nontaxpayers don’t bother filing 1040 forms.

At one table sat Mr. Doug Vandergriff from the Chattanooga Vandergriff family. He’d come from the big city with three others. He is an elderly man, but as recently as 2009, ran for Congress and pulled he said 70,000 votes compared to the 200,000 pulled by Rep. Fleischmann.

Mr. Vandergriff finally ran as a Democrat, one holding the Democratic parties and protax, pro-welfare positions. He explained as we went through our chicken, greenbeans and salad had he had been elected he would have sharply curbed the government’s rich living on loans and taxes.

Also speaking for a few minutes was a Blount County Commissioner, Karen Miller. She sat with her husband, Keith. She defended marriage in a resolution that was shot down the majority of 21 members of the board of commissioners.

Jake Griffin is homeschooled, and though only 15 says he wants to run for public office. (Photo Facebook, Noogaradio page)

Jake Griffin is homeschooled, and though only 15 says he wants to run for public office. (Photo Facebook, Noogaradio page)

At front table was a 15 year old boy, Mrs. Griffin’s grandson, Jake Griffin, 15, besuited in dark, owner of a rifle. It was said at the meeting that he will be running for office when he is 21 It was his 15th time attending the Bill of Rights dinner.

Jake has been to 15 patriotic banquets and says he will be a candidate someday for state representative. He says he hasn’t thought about exactly which issues matter. “I support the Bible and good moral values,” said the Evensville teen in a Facebook interview.

With him was Jillian Edmonds, 16, one of six homeschooling children there with siblings and her parents. Her mother, Jennifer, is a supporter of Mrs. Gaddy.

In a deep and expressive voice, Jillian says the Bill of Rights dinner is a good experience for her. She was more apt to give an interview, and has much more to say than Jake. She declined to appear on a Facebook interview, though Jake gives it his best shot (Noogaradio page on Facebook. Please like us).

I told Jake that if he is to be taken seriously, he should have a business card. He vowed next year to have one. The girl said she would encourage him in prospective meetings with the press.

Matriarch of constitution

Mrs. Griffin has long been a remarkable figure in southeast Tennessee. She is a bane of Chattanooga talk show hosts and is held to a strict monthly limit by newspaper editors who oversee letters to the editor.

She has petitioned County commissions across the state to adopt the Bible as their standard of law.

She has opposed the queer agenda and spoken in favor of the gospels and its fruits, including marriage. She has attended court cases. She is aware of Christian people being confronted by the state and the exercise of their rights. She read a list of “political prisoners” in jails across the U.S. today who insist on their rights at great personal sacrifice.

The event insists much remains to fight for — liberties to be retained, others to be restored. Mrs. Griffin quoted an authority saying that Tennessee has the best constitution of all the states. It has numerous provisions which require the people to resist tyranny and slavishness.

Among the enemies of liberty: judges. Though Mrs. Griffin is sometimes a bit expansive as to her own role in particular legislative or legal matters, she is very much on the mark as to the strength of American law. Personal commitments to liberty matter. God blesses them, she said.

Tent preacher  of liberty

The Bill of Rights dinner isn’t just about evoking mushy pieties about the Founders, sentimental Americana with its pentacles and military parades. It offers a bit of clear legal advice. It asserts that liberty is not self-executing, self-enabling. It exists only if it is asserted in person, and belligerently asserted or claimed. It’s about being a belligerent claimant in person, though that term fell from no one’s lips Thursday.

Mrs. Griffin is a woman of tremendous conviction and protest. 15 years ago or so she rescinded her social security number and believes herself unable to use a car for travel because she cannot drive. Her friend Ruth Ann Wilson, who who helped set the Patriotic placemats, agrees to take her here and there in her car.

Liberty is not self-executing

A liberty simply is an opportunity to claim a freedom of movement. If people do not defy pressure against these liberties written in the law, they do not have them. I don’t know how many of the people at the meeting would have put it that way, but they admire those who have paid a personal price in defending freedom and liberty.

Liberty has to be exercised by individuals. That point was made very clearly by the event organizer. Liberty, Mrs. Griffin said, does not attach to groups. Rights are personal, she said.

And there for personal they cannot be physically. That have to be defended personally on the scene and the threats made against them. Liberty is defended by individuals.

Mrs. Griffin should be fairly considered to be the matriarch of the Constitution is Tennessee. That is an appellation she would gratefully receive.

And it is true with each passing year as people are more willing to humor Mrs. Griffin, with her strong sense of justice, her visible indignation at villains in black robes, her ramblings or boasts rub them the wrong way. She has become softened with the power to recollect many past battles against evil ideas and complacency, and pivots her bright lights less into one’s eyes and out across the dark sidewalk outside the Dayton veterans hall on a cold night with a full moon hung among the clouds.

“If you go into a court in Tennessee, they do not give a whit about your rights. They do not care.” She told a friend studying law that she should put away her study of the constitution in preparing or the bar. All the student needs is to study the past 10 years of the federal supreme court, and one could ace the bar exam, she averred.

Corrupt officials in the U.S. government since 1964 have worked to remove Christianity and Christian people from the public square. “All this talk about equality? There is no equality. You’re just being scooted out. The bill of rights is not to give us rights. It is that government cannot take them away.”

In Red Russia, a splendid constitution existed on paper, but the citizen had no mechanism by which to enforce his rights against government power, she said.

The event had a change of venue at the last minute. The American Legion reneged on its arrangements with Mrs. Griffin and did not open its space to her, she said. Harmony House cafe, run by John Piatt, handled the festivities.

A cold night enfolds the street in Dayton, Tenn., from which one escapes into Harmony cafe for the Bill of Rights dinner. (Photo David Tulis)

A cold night enfolds the street in Dayton, Tenn., from which one escapes into Harmony cafe for the Bill of Rights dinner. (Photo David Tulis)

Continue Reading:  

Nooganomics.com  |

 

Nooganomics-David_Tulis-AM

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on TennesseeWatchman.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of TennesseeWatchman.com or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

TennesseeWatchman.com

 if the watchman sees the sword coming and does not blow the trumpet, and the people are not warned, and the sword comes and takes any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity; but his blood I will require at the watchman’s hand.
%d bloggers like this: