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Jets scar morning sky over Chattanooga; but program halved

A car leaves the Waffle House at the bottom of the hill on Highway 153 in Hixson. (Photo David Tulis)

A car leaves the Waffle House at the bottom of the hill on Highway 153 in Hixson, its driver no doubt dazzled by the demonstration of aerial prowess of a civil authority that runs a military weather program wreathed in secrecy. (Photo David Tulis)

Negative emissions by jet aircraft are part of the federal government’s war on global warming, operating on the theory that cloud cover dims sunlight. (Photo David Tulis)

Negative emissions by jet aircraft are part of the federal government’s war on global warming, operating on the theory that cloud cover dims sunlight. (Photo David Tulis)

Intensive coverage over Chattanooga creates a cloudbank south and east of the city toward noon. This view is looking south on Highway 153. (Photo David Tulis)

Intensive jet coverage over Chattanooga creates a cloudbank south and east of the city toward noon. This view is looking south on Highway 153, with a jet taking off from Lovell Field near the top of the frame. (Photo David Tulis)

Looking north, jets carve up the sky and create cloud cover. (Photo David Tulis)

Looking north from my radio station studio in Hixson, jets carve up the sky and create cloud cover. (Photo David Tulis)

This view greets me Monday morning as I quit my house in Soddy-Daisy for my office in Hixson, in north Chattanooga. (Photo David Tulis)

This view greets me Monday morning as I quit my house in Soddy-Daisy for my office in Hixson, in north Chattanooga. (Photo David Tulis)

Clouds of coal fly ash form in the eastern sky over Chattanooga on Monday morning. (Photo David Tulis)

Clouds of coal fly ash form in the eastern sky over Chattanooga on Monday morning. (Photo David Tulis)

The mechanical and hydraulic process of pouring dust into the sky is suggested by the dripping nature of many artificial weather-modification dust streams, as these over a shopping center in northern Chattanooga. (Photo David Tulis)

The mechanical and hydraulic process of pouring dust into the sky is suggested by the dripping nature of many artificial weather-modification dust streams, as these over a shopping center in northern Chattanooga. (Photo David Tulis)

This photo from Soddy-Daisy was taken Aug. 29, showing how a sky tattoo converts itself into a cloud. But cloud cover traps heat, exacerbating the global warming problems, critics say. (Photo David Tulis)

This photo from Soddy-Daisy was taken Aug. 29, showing how a sky tattoo converts itself into a cloud. But cloud cover traps heat, exacerbating the global warming problems, critics say. (Photo David Tulis)

The nation’s environmental watchdog on Monday overflew Chattanooga and Hamilton County in force in a visitation demonstrating its aerial prowess, trailing dozens of ash plumes over the city starting at daybreak. By 11 a.m., the jets’ task was complete, and they vanished.

A cloud blanket hovered along the city’s southeastern parts. During the afternoon, the sky was mostly clear blue as if nothing had happened.

By David Tulis / Noogaradio 92.7

Sky striping activity by the U.S. government appears to have diminished over the past several months, giving opponents of the ash deposit program occasion to wonder if President Trump has ordered an end to the solar radiation management program, one launched in the 1960s.

Monday’s overflights were remarkably intense, unlike other sky striping days in past months. But the schedule of cloud-creating treatments has been scaled back.

A record kept by this writer says jets trails negative emissions over the sky 13 days in June. In July, 11 days. In August, 7 days. In September, only five days. Monday was the third day of jet emissions in October, so it appears the slowdown in treatment continues.

Paul Barys and other weather monitors in Chattanooga dismiss sky striping as mere innocuous water vapor created by hot jet engines altering moist, cold air at high altitudes.

The program of using regulated pollutants to modify the weather is controversial. The government refuses to speak openly about the practice of weather modification using fly ash, a waste product of the coal-burning utilities such as TVA. And yet academia and government scientists such as David Keith of Harvard University and Ken Caldiera of Carnegie Institution in California are happy to discuss the future potential of sun-dimming cloud cover as an academic and theoretical ideal.

These insiders keep up appearances, even publishing a poll of scientists indicating that no scientist thinks such a program exists today.

Critics of the program, such as Dane Wigington of Geoengineeringwatch.org, warn of evil health effects from inhaling the highly regulated toxic waste and warn that government interference with normal weather patterns are responsible for extraordinary weather patterns in the past decade, including hurricanes, droughts, bizarre snowfalls and floods.

A major break in the story came in 2015 when an independent scientist, J. Marvin Herndon of San Diego, reported that the material being sprayed in cloud-forming long white tattoos is coal fly ash, a material highly agreeable for government use. It contains reflective metals and is light enough to remain airborne as an atmospheric reflector. It is also the fruit of utility recycling programs that allows it to be bought cheaply. American utilities produce more than 50 million tons of coal fly ash a year, with nearly half recycled into various products such as tarmac and wallboard.

U.S. sky stripe program boosted by huge coal ash sector

‘Toxic nightmare’ as war on global warming drags white coal fly ash across sky

Stay indoors? Massive deposits today over city

Two suns set over city as jets scar sky, emit blanket of haze

U.S. weather program pushes TN into drought, firestorms

Barys lets city slumber over aerial outrage he dismisses as ‘water vapor’

TennesseeWatchman.com

 if the watchman sees the sword coming and does not blow the trumpet, and the people are not warned, and the sword comes and takes any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity; but his blood I will require at the watchman’s hand.

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