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Immigration, Inequality, and America’s Future

The key trick of Reihan Salam's new book, Melting Pot or Civil War?, is that it neatly bridges the yawning partisan gap on immigration using issues that concern both sides. We can have social equality and solidarity, Salam argues, or we can have immigration; we cannot possibly have both. The post Immigration, Inequality, and America’s Future appeared first on Washington Free Beacon. ... [...]

September 23, 2018

A Man of His Time

Imagine you had to pick one person to represent a certain era. Who would you choose for the 1920s? The 2000s? The 1780s? It's an interesting thought exercise, and in Arthur Ashe: A Life, Raymond Arsenault presents a compelling case for why Ashe, more than anyone, lived a life that most reflected his time. A black man coming of age during the Civil Rights Movement, a soldier during the Vietnam War, a leading anti-apartheid activist, a victim of AIDS during the early days of awareness of the disease—at nearly every turn of his life, Ashe was front and center with some of the most important issues facing the nation. The post A Man of His Time appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.... [...]

September 23, 2018

Jung at Heart

Carl Jung is back. Well, in a minor way. In the sense of, like, never having entirely disappeared since his death in 1961. Jung is the little train engine of psychology: still in service, still hauling freight and passengers on a narrow-gauge railroad off somewhere in the distance. Never the main line, but maybe for that reason never an abandoned line, either. And every 10 years or so, something causes readers to notice that Jung somehow endures, chugging along as he always has. The post Jung at Heart appeared first on Washington Free Beacon. ... [...]

September 22, 2018

‘The House with a Clock in Its Walls’ Review

The House with a Clock in Its Walls, the adaptation of a beloved children's book, is directed by Eli Roth. The same Eli Roth who made the Hostel movies, which practically defined the term "torture porn," as well as Cabin Fever and the recent Death Wish reboot and the cannibalism-oriented eco-horror film The Green Inferno. The same Eli Roth who played the baseball-bat-wielding Bear Jew in Inglourious Basterds and directed Knock Knock, a film in which Keanu Reeves is first seduced and then tortured by a pair of naughty school girls. The post ‘The House with a Clock in Its Walls’ Review appeared first on Washington Free Beacon. ... [...]

September 21, 2018

The New Greg Packer

D.C. has its own Greg Packer — and his name is Phillip Carlisle. The post The New Greg Packer appeared first on Washington Free Beacon. ... [...]

September 15, 2018

How To Stop The Administrative State

One cannot help but read Judicial Fortitude as a creature of its moment. Released as it is in the midst of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, Peter Wallison's work is an unabashed call to arms for the new conservative judiciary. His analysis is far from novel—theorists have raised similar concerns for decades. But it comes as the conservative legal movement is about to clinch its greatest victory in 40 years: a Supreme Court majority. The post How To Stop The Administrative State appeared first on Washington Free Beacon. ... [...]

September 15, 2018

Avenue to Oblivion

Jonathan Neumann has written a splendid book. The first-time author has produced a devastating broadside against Jewish radicals who have co-opted tikkun olam—a Hebrew phrase meaning "to heal (or repair) the world"—to claim a special Jewish religious obligation to engage in left-wing politics. "This theology is a contrived religious system," he writes, "a sort of New Age mysticism that distorts the biblical Creation story and Kabbalistic (Jewish mystical) motifs in order to portray the politics of social justice as an organic Jewish teaching." The post Avenue to Oblivion appeared first on Washington Free Beacon. ... [...]

September 9, 2018

Delacroix: Rebellious Romanticist and Conservative Classicist

Eugene Delacroix bucked whenever he was labeled a romanticist. "I am a pure classicist," he insisted. That could come as a surprise: He is often called the leader of the romanticist genre that spread through the first half of the 19th century. While both movements celebrate the past, romanticism is unbridled while classicism is reserved. The Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibit Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, a preview for a far larger retrospective opening Sept. 17, shows that Delacroix managed to embody both. His commitment to "pure" classicism led to a romanticist style, however unintentional. The post Delacroix: Rebellious Romanticist and Conservative Classicist appeared first on Washington Free Beacon. ... [...]

September 9, 2018

The Nations of the Earth

By the time the fire alarms sound at the Hudson Institute a few minutes into Tuesday afternoon, dozens of protesters have already been arrested for disrupting proceedings at the opening Kavanaugh confirmation hearing across town. So, though no one bothers to move even a little toward the exits, when the alarm turns out to be false one wonders, if just for a moment, whether this wasn't a deliberate delay. After all, nationalism is, at least to so many these days, such a dirty word. The post The Nations of the Earth appeared first on Washington Free Beacon. ... [...]

September 8, 2018

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